Wednesday, April 04, 2007

How to save Israeli kidnapped soldiers

As you probably know, Iran has succumbed, and is ready to return the 15 kidnapped British soldiers. Of course, had Iran had it's way, it would have kept humiliating and torturing British public for years, promising small pieces of information about the well being of the soldiers in exchange for political concessions and release of thousands of terrorists from prisons in Britain and US. That is, just the way it works with Israel. The way it "ought" to be. Yet, USA freed exactly 1 Iranian prisoner to get all 15 soldiers back alive. What's going on here?

What is going on is that Iran got military threatened. "But wait a minute", you might say, "Israel not only threatened Hezballah, Israel started a war against it!". True. And pointless. As Bibi Netaniahu once correctly pointed out, there is no such thing as Hezbollah. There is arm of Iranian army that calls itself by this name. The only way to force their hand is to threaten Iran. Threatening Hezballah is as ridiculous as Britain threatening some "Iranian coast guard" would sound like.

Israel needs to go after the villain, not it's arm. And the guys will be back home. Together with Ron Arad. If he is still alive.

3 comments:

Irina Tsukerman said...

I think there's something more going on here than just that. Frankly, I'm surprised Ahmadinejad gave in so quickly... Hmm, there might be something happening we don't know about! : )

Yury Puzis said...

What's happening is that the threat from 4 aircraft carriers near Iran is all too real. They actually believed that Bush will attack on April 6. They got scared, because not only the nuclear facilities, but also the oil refineries, the anti-aircraft defenses, all their 200 plains, the navy, the port terminals, are going to be destroyed. It can do more then postpone the nuclear bomb, it can destabilize their power.

Yury Puzis said...

If you are implying they got something in return in secret, I doubt so. The only point of the kidnapping was *public* politics.